Tagged: Social network

Marriage From Hell Forming Between Facebook, Coca Cola & RFID Technology

Logo of the anti-RFID campaign by German priva...

Image via Wikipedia

Copyright 2010-3010 By Chase Kyla Hunter, All Rights Reserved.

I have never trusted the Facebook Concept. I couldn’t tell you why. Call it woman’s intuition, or possibly the Cherokee shaman’s precognition which goes with me wherever I travel. I had suspected that at some point the horrible truth might finally come out about Facebook, but I honestly did not know it would come out this soon. I actually joined the site under another pen name about 8 weeks ago, and played with it for about 2-3 weeks.

The very first thing I noticed was how easy it was to dig deep into the online ID of another total stranger and study every friend and relative they had, every post they had ever written, every keystroke they had ever entered, and that there is practically ZERO privacy on Facebook unless you make an effort to click into the privacy settings, and laboriously reset every single one of over 100 items. And even then the settings you choose will often mysteriously default back to the way they were before you changed them. Someone else is always driving the vehicle on FB and it’s NOT the user. The unaware user of Facebook is just naively going along for the ride.

Even after I went in, and took 30 minutes to set all my privacy protocols just the way I wanted them, I found the eerie experience re-occurring of  returning to my privacy settings later to find out  they had all been mysteriously “re-set” to the wide open “no hold barred tell all, show all” default.

This experience, which I had at least three times, told me that there is something deeply wrong with what users experience on Facebook, and that Facebook itself, is really nothing more than a thinly veiled front for a massive“private citizen data mining and online surveillance operation” by our assorted US spy agencies: the CIANSA, NCS and others. I am as sure of this as I am that I am sitting here in this chair. It’s not speculation for me anymore.

I also quickly discovered that Christians and Christianity are not the “favored” identities to the computerized Facebook protocols. One evening I had another spooky and inexplicable experience. I wanted to place certain keywords in my profile so that other Christians could find me a little bit easier. [ My entire reason and motive for joining Facebook had been to not only investigate just how secretly rotten this portal is, but to examine how it worked and report on it, which I am doing now. ]

So I was trying to enter the keyword phrases like:” Jesus follower“, “Jesus of Nazareth”, “Lord Jesus Christ” “Christian Conservative” “Tea Party Patriot” and so forth into my profile. Every time I entered these phrases they vanished. They just disappeared. I entered and re-entered these keyword phrases 6 times over before I realized that the pre-coded protocols of Facebook WAS NOT going to allow me to place those phrases into my profile, yet there was a persistent ongoing effort to get me to put into the profile instead:

My location

My vocation

My date of birth

My high school and college, etc.

Which brings me to my next point. If Facebook is actually really a social networking site, then why was I “put into FaceBook jail” so to speak, and disallowed from returning to the site for 4 days after I networked with about 40 or 50 new and old Christian friends over the course of 2-3 days? The site actually blocked my access for 4 days and sent me a message each time I tried to log in that I had “tried to friend too many people that the site didn’t think I really knew,” therefore I would be disallowed from using Facebook for four days. How the hell would Facebook know who I might know or who I don’t?  The whole experience would have been infuriating if it wasn’t so outright strange and darkly comical. I have been using the internet since 1993. That year predates the invention of the word “internet.” NEVER have I had such a preposterous web experience as I did while experimentally using Facebook for those 3 weeks.

During that time I was also trying to re-establish contact with a network of about 30 musicians from the northern New Mexico region that I have known for more than 20 years. But the computer protocols at Facebook just arbitrarily decided that I could not possibly know all these people, and knocked me off the site. I was actually put in Facebook “time out” for trying to use the site exactly the way it was supposedly designed: to locate long lost friends, family, peers, buddies, etc.

After having my “Facebook moment” for 2 or 3 weeks, my former suspicions have become steadfast convictions. I actually don’t believe for one minute that Facebook is really about social networking. I believe that it’s a brilliant “cover story, a facade, a game of online smoke and mirrors” for an emerging global internet super-surveillance BEAST. I also know exactly how RFID technology will be used to supplement, and eventually to become mandatory for continued use of that online BEAST presence. Please watch the following videos:

See also: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BkIfFv11iQ

Marriage from Hell Now Forming Between Coca Cola, Facebook and The American Teenage Idiot

For the thinking human being who is attentive to actuality and values their privacy, both personal and intellectual, the implications of this second video are nothing short of horrendous:

Coca-Cola & Facebook sponsor a teenage pool party where RFID wristbands are handed out to all attendees, which update their Facebook profiles for them each time they are scanned – a particularly heinous example of a very public “PSY OP” where masses of young adults are socially engineered to believe that wearing an RFID wristband is a cool, benevolent harmless thing: Wrong!These young people have no idea what is being foisted on them under the disguise of convenience. Once these chips become mandatory, which is what the ruling elites have in mind, it won’t be so much fun anymore. Fail to comply with whatever they want yuo to do, and they turn off your chip, your access to cash and everything else is disconnected. That’s the goal.

I’ll put it bluntly: If the GOAL of the Illuminati motivated and directed New World Order is to addict every child, teen and young adult to Facebook, in order to subtly tacitly begin introducing RFID technology to these population sectors, connecting their Facebook profile to an RFID chip [on a card, on an ID tag, etc, eventually inserted into the flesh of the hand ]  then Facebook is the PERFECT tool with which to achieve this GOAL. Facebook, as far as I am concerned, is part and parcel  to the goals of the NWO to microchip every human being on earth, and I do not want to have anything to do with it. At some point in the next few days I will post the link to this essay on my Facebook profile [Oceanica Blue]. When I do, we’ll see how the behemoth reacts. And that will be my next post on this topic, I suppose.

See also http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LqwDqN7LNsc

In the meantime, truth telling videos which try to warn the unwashed Facebook masses about what is really afoot, are quietly disappearing from the web. Here’s what I got when I tried to watch a video called:  “The Truth About Facebook and Your Privacy” ….

I have already written about the mystery of the disappearing Youtube videos which discuss and reveal the hidden plans for RFID Chipping human beings. Not all have been removed, but very many of them have. So I spend my nights trolling the video news portals looking for items I can embed and download that the NWO hasn’t removed yet. Internet censorship is creeping in. If there were nothing to hide, there would be nothing to censor, would there? If there were no hidden plans to foist this terrible “mandatory human RFID chipping” upon people, there would be no need to censor the articles, essays, and videos about it. Correct?

Beware the seemingly benign goals and purposes of Facebook, for it is NOT how it appears. Become a true thinking man or woman. Think before you begin posting the intimate details of your life, your face, [FB uses facial recognition software to scan and store all face images posted ] and every other identifying packet of info about who you are. The day may come when you very greatly desire NOT to have an RFID chip placed in your hand against your will. If you have, prior to that time, loaded up every parcel of privacy about yourself onto Facebook in the years preceding, you will be a sitting duck. They will know how to find you. Think before you post!

Chase Kyla Hunter

Related stories, links, videos:

National Healthcare ID Cards Could Lead to Eventual RFID Hell on Earth

Is the FED and the CIA Spying on Twitter Accounts?

FBI Target Uses Reverse Psychology, Floods Web With His Personal Details: odd But True Story

Walmart Blue Jeans Now RFID Chipped: Buy Your Jeans at a Thrift Instead!

Tracking Your Clothes Via RFID: Walmart

Verichip RFID666 Beast Human Microchip TV Advertisement Is Heinous

An internet collection of videos about privacy, surveillance, the FED spy agencies

Liquid Matrix Security Digest News Feed

Related Articles
Advertisements

6 Ways to Score a Job Through Twitter [link & re-post]

11.27.2010 link and re-post by CK Hunter

See http://mashable.com/2010/11/27/twitter-job-tips/

Twitter has become a great resource for just about anything, including jobs. From industry chats to Twitter accounts dedicated to posting vacancies, there are a ton of resources for landing a gig.

We’ve already chronicled how to get a job through Facebook (Facebook) and YouTube (YouTube), and now we’re taking a look at the job hunting process on Twitter.

We spoke with nine Tweeters who have landed jobs through Twitter (Twitter) to get their top tips for success on the platform. Below you’ll find a guide to their job hunt strategies on the microblogging service.

If you’ve also been successful in finding a position via Twitter, let us know about your experience in the comments below.


1. Tweet Like an Industry Expert


Words to tweet by: You are what you tweet. Keep in mind that everything you tweet lends to — or takes away from — your online persona. Whether or not you’re searching for a job, make sure your Twitter stream represents you as a professional individual that has important and unique thoughts to contribute. Your goal should be to become an industry expert — or at least tweet like one.

Share links that are relevant to your followers, adding commentary to the latest industry news. This shows that you’re keeping up with industry trends and gives potential employers a look into what you read and care about, which will help them to envision how you may fit into their company’s work environment.

If your commentary on Twitter is interesting enough, you may have employers knocking on your door. Christa Keizer, a recent intern at Cone, a strategy and communications firm, used Twitter during her job search to “[post] relevant, industry-related tweets on a daily basis to establish credibility.” After commenting on one of Cone’s blogs, Marcus Andrews, the New Media Associate at Cone, tweeted to Keizer, thanking her for her comment and asking her about her summer work plans. A few tweets and an interview later, Keizer was hired.

Kate Ottavio, an account executive at PR agency Quinn & Co., had a similar experience. Prior to working at Quinn, she ran her own PR firm. One day, Allyns Melendez, HR Director at Quinn, started following Ottavio on Twitter — she waited for Ottavio to follow back, and then asked her if she’d like to move to New York, where Quinn is headquartered. Little did she know, Melendez was looking for a new hire for the real estate division of the firm. Melendez had first searched for “PR” and “real estate” on LinkedIn (LinkedIn), where Ottavio’s profile popped up.

Although Ottavio wasn’t looking for a job at the time, her Twitter strategy had always been to “represent myself as a knowledgeable and reputable PR professional. I tweet about 10-20 times a day about anything from personal experiences to Mashable (Mashable) articles to PR blog posts.” Loving the opportunity that Quinn presented her, she promptly accepted.


2. Use Twitter Hashtags


There are lots of ways to use Twitter hashtags to get a job. Here are a few types of hashtags to get you started:

  • Job Listings: You can find general job advice and lots of listings through hashtags like #jobs, #recruiting, #jobadvice, #jobposting, #jobhunt and #jobsearch. To narrow it down, though, seek out more specific hashtags, such as or #prjobs or #salesjobs.
  • Industry Conferences: Most conferences these days have their own hashtags — when a relevant industry conference is approaching, get active with attendees using the hashtag. Whether you’re attending the conference or not, you can contribute to the conversation. Many conferences also have live streams, so it’s as if you’re attending anyway! Live tweet panels and speeches that you’re interested in and connect with other tweeters along the way. By using Twitter for networking within your industry, you’ll increase your chances of getting hired down the road.
  • Job-Related and Industry Chats: Getting involved with industry chats is a way to show your industry in a particular field and represent yourself as a knowledgeable person. Check out this Twitter chat schedule to get a head start. Also, if your search isn’t going so well, get involved in job-related chats, such as #jobhuntchat, #careerchat, #internchat and #hirefriday for friendly advice.
  • Liz (Pope) Schmidt, now the media and research manager at Sevans Strategy, attested to the power of industry Twitter chats: “I began participating in #Journchat, created and hosted by Sarah Evans [owner of Sevans Strategy, a public relations and new media consultancy]. Although I had known Sarah from a past virtual work experience, I was able to reconnect with her through Twitter. I mentioned her in several tweets and participated in her online discussions. Soon after, based on a direct message conversation with Sarah on Twitter, I came on board at Sevans Strategy.”

    Besides scouring job search hashtags, job seekers can also follow Twitter accounts dedicated to posting job openings, use Twitter search to find postings or keep an eye out on the Twitter streams of companies they might want to work for.


    3. Connect with Recruiters and Current Employees


    Don’t be afraid to research the companies that you want to work for to find out who currently works there and who is involved with recruiting. After all, while you’re searching for a job, recruiters are scouring the web at the same time looking for pertinent information about job candidates. Interacting with current employees and active recruiters is an easy way to learn more about a company and its job opportunities.

    Take Connie Zheng’s word — she’s already been hired for two jobs through Twitter. “I got my PR internship at Text 100 using Twitter, as well as my entry-level position at Burson-Marsteller using Twitter,” she explained. She advises job seekers, “Use Twitter as a research tool to identify who the appropriate HR person or recruiter is at the desired company.”

    Shankar Ganesh, a student at the Shanmugha Arts, Science, Technology and Research Academy in India, recently landed a marketing consulting internship at business apps provider Zoho Corporation by connecting with a technologist employed by the company. “I wanted to spend my summer as an intern at Zoho (zoho), so I approached employees using Twitter,” he recounted. “I showed them what I had done previously and my website for credibility. My interest was forwarded to Zoho’s HR team, and we got in touch.” Soon after, he was offered the internship.

    Even if a company isn’t hiring, it’s a good idea to stay in contact with recruiters and employees. When a position opens up, it’s likely that you’ll be one of the first to be contacted, said Alison Morris, an account coordinator at The CHT Group, a strategic communications firm based in Boston. Morris told us how she landed her current position on Twitter:

    “In April 2010, Ben Hendricks, Senior VP at The CHT Group, and I began corresponding about corporate communications and social media’s role in the corporate environment. Much to my dismay, CHT was not yet hiring. In June, after a few months distance, Ben sent me an email to let me know the agency was hiring and that he wanted me to apply. Still looking for a job, I sent over my resume, and about a week later, I was employed.”

    Keep an eye out for socially savvy companies like CHT — it also recently hired Marissa Green as an account coordinator through Twitter and is now looking for a spring intern, with Twitter being one of its main recruiting outlets.


    4. Build a Relevant Network


    A lot of successful Twitter job stories actually end with the punchline, “I wasn’t even looking for a job.” In many cases, these lucky new hires just found interesting opportunities serendipitously, which makes sense given that it’s Twitter we’re talking about.

    Twitter is all about networking, so build a network that makes sense for you. You’ll find that a lot of the opportunities that are presented to you are simply organic. Here’s an anecdote along those lines from Marketing & Communications Manager for digital agency ChaiONE, Meghan Stephens:

    “Through Twitter, I am connected to other marketing professionals, digital creatives, community stewards, and new media experts — simply because those are the types of people that I enjoy interacting with and learning from… When it came time to look for a job in the technology sector, all I did was turn to those who I already gained inspiration from. When glancing through my stream, I saw a job link posted by my now-boss that sounded immediately like what I was looking for. I read through the description, realized I already knew the company through another connection made on Twitter, and sent in my resume.”


    5. Start a “Hire Me” Campaign


    After seeing a job posting for HeadBlade, a men’s grooming company that makes products specifically for guys that shave their heads, Eric Romer immediately set up a website, Twitter page, Facebook Page and YouTube account all in the name of nabbing the job.

    ‘The posting for ‘Interactive and Social Media Marketing Manager’ was tweeted from the HeadBlade Twitter account, which I had been following for several months,” explained Romer. “I have been a die-hard ‘HeadBlader’ using their products religiously since 2005, so this was literally a dream job.”

    “While there were several channels used, Twitter was by far the most effective getting on HeadBlade’s radar,” said Romer. “I received a call from a company rep within 48 hours of my initial blog posting, and flew from Indianapolis to L.A. within 10 days for an interview.”

    While a full-out campaign of this nature may not be the best strategy for every job opportunity that comes along, this type of passion is what really stands out in the job recruiting process. If you encounter your dream job, go all out.


    6. Take It Offline



    Three simple words: “Let’s get coffee.”Once you’ve gained a certain level of dialogue with a potential employer, an in-person meeting can really boost the relationship.

    DJ Waldow, director of community at Blue Sky Factory, said that he landed his job at the company through connecting with Blue Sky Factory’s CEO Greg Cangialosi on Twitter. After initially “stalking” Cangialosi on Twitter, Waldow began engaging with him. Eventually, all of the tweets lead to an in-person meeting, which Waldow feels really sealed the deal. He wrote of the experience:

    “The transition from online to in real life is critical… All of the loose connections you’ve made with that person are suddenly solidified when you put the name/avatar/tweets together with a face. Nothing can replace this. Nothing.”


    Your Tips


    With the increasing popularity of Twitter, more and more job seekers and recruiters are turning to the social network to find leads. We suspect that a sizable number of Mashable readers have used Twitter in some way to find a job. If so, let us know about your experiences in the comments below.


    Social Media Job Listings


    Every week we put out a list of social media and web job opportunities. While we post a huge range of job listings, we’ve selected some of the top social media opportunities from the past two weeks to get you started. Happy hunting!


    More Job Search Resources from Mashable:


    5 Tips for Aspiring Social Media Marketers
    HOW TO: Use Twitter Hashtags to Boost Your Job Search
    HOW TO: Land a Career in Digital Public Relations
    10 Tips for Aspiring Digital Marketers
    What Companies Want in a Social Media Intern