Why Do the First 10 Frames of Certain “Toy Story 3” TV Ads Have the Phrase “RED HERRING” in Them?

7.8.2010 By CK Hunter

How bizaree is this recent “mass media” dicovery:

Ok, Pixar. I really want to know. As a retired graphic arts, media and advertising professional I know several things. Never, and I repeat, never, is an animated image or TV spot released into the media without absolute scrutiny of every minute detail of what’s in it, down to an examination of every frame of that advertisement. Why do I know? Because I designed advertisements for more than 20 years.

That having been said, I would utterly love to know why you strategically placed the words “red herring” in an image in the background of the first 10-12 frames of the newest TV ads for Toy Story 3. WTF?

What are you trying to tell us Pixar? Are you flaunting the fact that many contemporary motion pictures are dazzling entertainment spectacles designed to distract the American and world public from being interested or looking into what is REALLY going on behind the scenes?

Most folks know that the phrase  “red herring” refers to someting which is used to distract attention from the real issue, event, or activity: in short, a decoy. Here’s the official definition under numbr 2:

red herring –noun 1.

1. a smoked herring.

2. something intended to divert attention from the real problem or matter at hand; a misleading clue.

3. Also called red-herring prospectus. Finance . a tentative prospectus circulated by the underwriters of a new issue of stocks or bonds that is pending approval by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission: so called because the front cover of such a prospectus must carry a special notice printed in red.

4. any similar tentative financial prospectus, as one concerning a pending or proposed sale of cooperative or condominium apartments.

There is certainly no crime involved in placing the words RED HERRING in the first 3 seconds of your most recent dazzling TV spot for Toy Story 3. But why? Why insert a well known folk phrase which is obviously coded to mean something, and thus incite flagrant speculation among intelligent media observers who will wonder what you are up to with bizarre subliminals in your otherwise delightful and engaging Toy Story 3 TV ads?

 Why did you have to flagrantly insert the phrase RED HERRING right in our faces in the first thee 3 seconds of this TV spot for Toy Story 3? I mean…. really: WTF Pixar?

 What’s up with RED HERRING?  Not all the TV spots have this odd subliminal – but below is the one that does, which appeared in my region exclusively as TV promo for the movie recently. Here tis folks – watch the first 3-5 seconds and you will see the RED HERRING text pink on dark pink as packaging text on a grocery store shelf:

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  • Chase Kyla Hunter on 7.8.2010

    2 comments

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